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Hare Doing Pushups bronze sculpture by Guy du Toit

Guy du Toit's bronze hares are highly popular works, exploring form through playful renderings of hares who engage in peculiar human-like behaviors such as sitting and thinking, fighting, dancing, or cheekily drinking wine. 

Hares have long been symbols of life & energy, fertility, death & rebirth; often with a close link to the moon, which Guy acknowledges in his work.

Guy's hares evoke fierce emotions of happiness, curiosity and sheer joy in the viewer. Their charm lies in their beautiful simplicity. 

Guy du Toit

Available Small Works

Available Large Works

"My objects come from my immediate environment, selected for their non-heroic, open-ended meaning.

Bells, for instance, may refer either to slavery or liberty.

My overriding concern is that of reality and illusion; the fusing of Western and African realities is somehow reflected in this ambiguity."

Guy du Toit with his bronze hare sculptures

Biography

Guy du Toit has, by virtue of steady production and consistently developing work, become one of South Africa’s most important and accomplished sculptors.

Born in 1958 in Rustenburg in South Africa's North West Province, Guy graduated from the University of Pretoria in 1982, being awarded his BA(FA) Degree with a distinction in sculpture.

“Liberated” by the advent of democracy in South Africa from having to concern himself and his art with the notions of Identity, he has turned his attention to “less provincial” pursuits like revelling in form, concept and media for their own sakes.

His bronze hares have become a highly popular series, exploring form through playful bronze renderings of hares who sit and ponder their thoughts, play, dance or box with each other — each holding a unique character and endearing quality.


Hares have long been symbols of life & energy, death & rebirth; often with a close link to the moon, which Guy acknowledges in his work.

 

His long-eared hares have a peculiar lightness of being whilst they engage in peculiar human behaviors such as fighting, dancing, climbing stairs, or cheekily drinking wine. The artist especially likes the hares to have a noble, ancient look.
 

A fundamental and deliberate attribute of Guy's hares, is that their charm lies in their beautiful simplicity.

He is represented internationally in the Smithsonian Institute, The House of Humour and Satire in Bulgaria, The Montgomery Sculpture Trust, and the Czech National Gallery in Prague.
 

Guy has been the recipient of various awards, and his works form part of private and public collections around the world.

Public & Outdoor Art